Skip navigation

Tag Archives: DIVERSITY

  • GREAT RELIGION–NOT

Saudi female journalist gets 60 lashes RIYADH, Saudi Arabia

– A Saudi court on Saturday sentenced a female journalist to 60 lashes who had been charged with involvement in a TV show in which a Saudi man publicly talked about sex. Rozanna al-Yami is believed to be the first Saudi woman journalist to be given such a punishment, but there were conflicting accounts about how the court issued its verdict. Al-Yami told The Associated Press it was her understanding that the judge at the court in the western city of Jiddah dropped the charges against her, which included involvement in the preparation of the program and advertising the segment on the Internet. But she said he still handed down the lashing sentence “as a deterrence.” “I am too frustrated and upset to appeal the sentence,” said al-Yami, 22. Al-Yami worked as a coordinator for the program, but she has said she did not work on the sex-show episode. Al-Yami refused to provide contact details for her lawyer to ask about the legal proceedings, including the basis in Islamic law for the punishment and whether the charges were really dropped. Sulaiman al-Jumeii, the lawyer for the man who appeared in the TV show, said such “physical punishment is not an indication of innocence or a drop of charges.” “If the judge had dropped the charges, then why did he give her the 60 lashes?” he added. Abdul-Rahman al-Hazza, the spokesman of the Ministry of Culture and Information, told the AP he had no details of the sentencing and could not comment on it. In the program, which aired in July on the Lebanese LBC satellite channel, the man, Mazen Abdul-Jawad appears to describe an active sex life and shows sex toys that were blurred by the station. The same court sentenced Abdul-Jawad earlier this month to five years in jail and 1,000 lashes. Al-Jumeii maintains his client was duped by the TV station and was unaware in many cases he was being recorded. On Saturday, he told the AP that not trying al-Yami before a court specialized in media matters at the Ministry of Culture and Information was a violation of Saudi law. “It is a precedent to try a journalist before a summary court for an issue that concerns the nature of his job,” he said. The case has scandalized this ultraconservative country where such public talk about sex is taboo and the sexes are strictly segregated. The government moved swiftly in the wake of the case, shutting down LBC’s two offices in the kingdom and arresting Abdul-Jawad, who works for the national airline. Three other men who appeared on the show, “Bold Red Line,” were also convicted of discussing sex publicly and sentenced to two years imprisonment and 300 lashes each. Copyright © 2009 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

WHAT A CROCK OF HOOIE!

SECURITY FIRST LAST AND ALWAYS!!!

Pick a sex and stay with it.  Get your travel documents to match your chosen sex and stick with it or stay home.  Real simple….

CNSNews.com

U.N. Report Says Counterterrorism Measures ‘Risk Unduly Penalizing Transgender Persons’
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
By Adam Brickley

(CNSNews.com) – A report by U.N. Special Rapporteur Martin Scheinin that is awaiting approval by the United Nations General Assembly says that security measures taken to detect terrorists “risk unduly penalizing transgender persons whose personal appearance and data are subject to change.”

The report, which was issued August 3, places emphasis on “persons of diverse sexual orientation and gender identities” and recommends that counterterrorism operations be more sensitive to gender issues.

On page 19 the report says: “Enhanced immigration controls that focus attention on male bombers who may be dressing as females to avoid scrutiny make transgender persons susceptible to increased harassment and suspicion.”

Just a few sentences later, Scheinin writes that “counter-terrorism measures that involve increased travel document security, such as stricter procedures for issuing, changing and verifying identity documents, risk unduly penalizing transgender persons whose personal appearance and data are subject to change.”

“This,” he claims, “jeopardizes the right of persons of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities to recognition before the law”

Frank Gaffney, founder and president of the Center for Security Policy, blasted the report in an interview with CNSNews.com

“It strikes me as a parody of U.N. political correctness and sexual universality,” Gaffney said, “and it’s just hard for me to believe that anybody thinks that these notions actually should trump security concerns – as I think it’s only too clear that … the people who are trying to blow us up have absolutely no use for any of these sexual proclivities.”

Gaffney also pointed out that terrorists “would be only too delighted to take advantage – indeed we’ve seen them taking advantage – of burqas and other subterfuges to disguise their malign intents.”

The report also takes aim at perceived gender roles, suggesting that counter-terror practices involving both sexes be reevaluated due to their basis in traditional perceptions of gender.

One passage, beginning on page 13, says that “the United Kingdom anti-radicalization initiatives seeking to include Muslim women as counter-terrorism agents on the basis of their position ‘at the heart not only of their communities but also of their families,’ may reinforce stereotypical gender norms about roles of women within the family.”

“Instead,” Scheinin writes, “participation should be grounded on principles of gender equality, recognizing the unique gendered impacts of both terrorism and counter-terrorism measures.”

Scheinin also slams the use of women’s rights as a justification for counter-terror operations, writing on page 14 that “counter-terrorism measures that are characterized as being a fight for women’s rights (such as the United States portrayal of its “war on terror” in Afghanistan in 2001) should be closely scrutinized, to ensure that they are not misinformed by gender-cultural stereotypes and are actually responsive to the concerns of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex individuals in local contexts.”

The use of masculine gender roles in counterterrorism draws Scheinin’s ire on page 18, where he writes that “techniques that seek to evoke feelings of emasculation in detainees or suspected terrorists may hinder the fight against terrorism by provoking hyper-masculine responses that include acceptance or advocacy of violence.”

Steven Groves, a fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation, expressed a lack of surprise at the report, saying that it was comparable with Scheinin’s past work for the UN and typical of the UN Human Rights Council.

“Instead of the Human Rights Council focusing how the human rights of people who are blown apart by terrorists impact people’s human rights,” Groves said, “they created a new office for someone to go and make sure that the terrorists’ human rights, and the human rights of almost everyone else – except for the victims of terrorism – are being protected, and so that is (Scheinin’s) mission.”

“That he would stray into some wrong-headed report about gender stereotypes as part of his mandate on counterterrorism isn’t a surprise to me,” Groves continued, “this is the way that the United Nations and the Human Rights Council work.”

Still, Frank Gaffney was flabbergasted by Scheinin’s report, saying, “I find this truly absurd and appalling.”

The report is currently pending approval by the U.N. General Assembly, and CNSNews.com has reported that social conservatives are mounting a campaign against it due to its redefinition of gender.

Like this story? Then sign up to receive our free daily E-Brief newsletter

Minorities Should Express Shame, Not

Only Pride
Dennis Prager TOWNHALL,COM
Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Gay Pride. Jewish Pride. Black pride. Hispanic Pride.

Multiculturalism.

Ethnic pride. Minority rights vs. tyranny of the majority.

For a generation, America has been awash in the celebration of minorities and minorities celebration of themselves. Just recall Black is Beautiful or I am a woman, I am invincible.

At the same time, the majority group in America — white Christians — has been allowed to celebrate very little. Rather, they have constantly been reminded of what they should be ashamed of — their racism, sexism, homophobia, patriarchy, and xenophobia — real and alleged.

But what about minority shame?

Why does one almost never hear expressions of group shame from members of any American group other than white Christians (specifically, white Christian male heterosexuals)? Are the only evildoers in America white male heterosexual Christians? Is there something inherently wrong about members of minorities expressing anything but group pride? Are there no minority sins worthy of shame? The latter is in fact the argument advanced by many intellectuals concerning black racism, for example. For a generation, college students have been taught that it is impossible for blacks to be racist because only the racial group in power, i.e. whites, can express racism.

Of course, that is nonsense. A black can be a racist just as a white can be one. A minority race might not have the power to implement racist national policies but that hardly means that no minority group, or any individual, can be a racist.

All this came to mind recently when, by coincidence, I read two things about the minority group of which I am a member — Jews. I just completed reading Anthony Beevors The Fall of Berlin 1945, in which the author writes that in the midst of the massive rape of German women (millions of girls and women of all ages) by Red Army troops, Jewish officers in the Red Army were known to be the one group that protected German girls and women. In Beevors words, Red Army officers who were Jewish went out of their way to protect German women and girls.

I fully admit to a sense of Jewish pride when I read that.

The next day I read a news report that because of the objections of one kindergartners mother, a public school in North Carolina had banned the singing of Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer because the song contained the word Christmas. I blame the school officials first and foremost for this craven and foolish decision. But when the news report noted that the woman was Jewish, my heart sank. Just as I had read the Beevor report and felt a surge of Jewish pride, I read the North Carolina story and felt a surge of Jewish shame.

It was a surge of Jewish shame that years ago led to one of the largest demonstrations of Israeli Jews in Israel’s history. They were demonstrating against the massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and Chatilla refugee camps in Lebanon. The killings were committed by Lebanese Christian militias, but they took place while Israel occupied that area of Lebanon.

It would seem, then, that group shame is a good thing.

There are at least three reasons:

1. It is maturing. Only children think only well of themselves. A group that only expresses pride is essentially a group of children.

2. If one expresses group pride, one is morally obligated to express group shame. Obviously, this does not apply to any person who does not identify with, let alone take pride in being a member of, a group.

3. If only the majority group is expected to express shame, then only the majority group is expected to be governed by rules of morality. It is, ironically, the highest moral compliment to Americas white Christians that they are the only American group of whom expressions of shame are expected. It means more is morally expected of them than of anyone else.

The relative absence of expressions of shame in the Muslim world over the atrocities committed in Islam’s name is an example of the above. The labeling of blacks who express shame over disproportionate rates of violent crime and out-of-wedlock births in the black community as Uncle Toms is another. The absence of any expression of shame in the gay community over the current blacklisting — and attempts to economically destroy — anyone who donated to the California proposition defining marriage as between a man and a woman is another example. When Sen. Joseph McCarthy blacklisted people in Hollywood for real or alleged support for the Communist Party, he was finally shut up with the words, Have you no shame, sir?

Expressing group shame when morally necessary is not airing dirty linen or giving solace to ones ideological enemies. It is, rather, one of the highest expressions of moral development. And it is therefore universally applicable. Being a minority doesn’t exempt its members from moral responsibility. It will be a great day for America and the world when minorities begin to express shame as well as pride. In fact, there is real pride in expressing shame. Minorities should give it a try.

Copyright © 2008 Salem Web Network. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.diversityinc.com

Why Did Yahoo! and Monster Quit Diversity?

By Daryl C. Hannah

©DiversityInc. Reproduction in any format is absolutely prohibited.

Keywords: Yahoo, Monster, economy, diversity newsletter

Even in this tough economy, progressive companies, especially those on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity® list, are maintaining or even escalating their commitment to diversity. But not Yahoo! and Monster, two companies that have never participated in the DiversityInc Top 50. To find out how diversity will withstand this recession, read “Why the Recession Won’t Kill Corporate Diversity Programs.”


Click here to enlarge.
Click Here to Subscribe for $19.99 and get a 22 x 351/2 poster of “Know Your Six Black Presidents” free.

Yahoo! announced in its Dec. 2 newsletter to subscribers that it is pulling the plug on its diversity newsletter. Yahoo! encouraged subscribers to sign up for general job alerts.

Also Read
Diversity 101: Five Short Topics You Can Present
Debunking the Attack on Diversity Training
An Easier Way to Strengthen Diversity Programs
Diversity Councils: Task Forces for Change
Verizon CEO Shares How Diversity Management Gets Results

Here’s what Yahoo! readers saw:


As for Monster, its publicly touted diversity focus–and chief diversity officer Steve Pemberton–are gone, and the company won’t talk about it. Despite three inquiries from DiversityInc, Monster maintains “no comment” on why its “commitment” to diversity is apparently gone.

Looking at both companies’ web sites, it’s clear there is no “commitment.”

Yahoo’s company web site has no mention of diversity on the homepage. And aside from touting being ranked by the Human Rights Campaign as one of the 100 best places for LGBT people to work, there is no mention of diversity on the Yahoo! Careers page either. And don’t think about typing in “diversity” as a keyword in the job search box–it yields no results.

And the same goes for Monster. Monster also has no mention of diversity on its corporate homepage or in its “Work for Us” section where company job opportunities can be found, and a search for “diversity” takes you to a blank page.

While Monster and Yahoo! don’t get diversity during these tough economic times, more progressive companies do. Here’s what they said:

“We never want to stop recruiting,” says Allen Thomas, chief diversity officer and managing partner for Deloitte LLP, No. 16 in the DiversityInc Top 50. “We want to have access to the talent pool as it’s changing. We, the country, will come out of this economic downturn, and those companies that took a longer view of recruiting will be in a better position to take advantage of recruiting.”

“Even though we are cutting back on hiring, we really want young undergrads and new generations [who] are more diverse,” says Liza Gutierrez, executive director of global diversity at Cummins, No. 20 in the DiversityInc Top 50.

“We have continued to hire; however, hiring has greatly decreased this year, considering our current business environment,” says Charlotte Neal, chief diversity officer for Toyota Motor North America, No. 48 in the DiversityInc Top 50. “Diversity and inclusion remains relevant through regular reviews of our talent pipeline to include recruiting/sourcing strategies, talent-availability studies, career development [and] succession planning through partnership with human resources.”

http://www.diversityinc.com

Why Did Yahoo! and Monster Quit Diversity?

By Daryl C. Hannah

©DiversityInc. Reproduction in any format is absolutely prohibited.

Keywords: Yahoo, Monster, economy, diversity newsletter

Even in this tough economy, progressive companies, especially those on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity® list, are maintaining or even escalating their commitment to diversity. But not Yahoo! and Monster, two companies that have never participated in the DiversityInc Top 50. To find out how diversity will withstand this recession, read “Why the Recession Won’t Kill Corporate Diversity Programs.”


Click here to enlarge.
Click Here to Subscribe for $19.99 and get a 22 x 351/2 poster of “Know Your Six Black Presidents” free.

Yahoo! announced in its Dec. 2 newsletter to subscribers that it is pulling the plug on its diversity newsletter. Yahoo! encouraged subscribers to sign up for general job alerts.

Also Read
Diversity 101: Five Short Topics You Can Present
Debunking the Attack on Diversity Training
An Easier Way to Strengthen Diversity Programs
Diversity Councils: Task Forces for Change
Verizon CEO Shares How Diversity Management Gets Results

Here’s what Yahoo! readers saw:


As for Monster, its publicly touted diversity focus–and chief diversity officer Steve Pemberton–are gone, and the company won’t talk about it. Despite three inquiries from DiversityInc, Monster maintains “no comment” on why its “commitment” to diversity is apparently gone.

Looking at both companies’ web sites, it’s clear there is no “commitment.”

Yahoo’s company web site has no mention of diversity on the homepage. And aside from touting being ranked by the Human Rights Campaign as one of the 100 best places for LGBT people to work, there is no mention of diversity on the Yahoo! Careers page either. And don’t think about typing in “diversity” as a keyword in the job search box–it yields no results.

And the same goes for Monster. Monster also has no mention of diversity on its corporate homepage or in its “Work for Us” section where company job opportunities can be found, and a search for “diversity” takes you to a blank page.

While Monster and Yahoo! don’t get diversity during these tough economic times, more progressive companies do. Here’s what they said:

“We never want to stop recruiting,” says Allen Thomas, chief diversity officer and managing partner for Deloitte LLP, No. 16 in the DiversityInc Top 50. “We want to have access to the talent pool as it’s changing. We, the country, will come out of this economic downturn, and those companies that took a longer view of recruiting will be in a better position to take advantage of recruiting.”

“Even though we are cutting back on hiring, we really want young undergrads and new generations [who] are more diverse,” says Liza Gutierrez, executive director of global diversity at Cummins, No. 20 in the DiversityInc Top 50.

“We have continued to hire; however, hiring has greatly decreased this year, considering our current business environment,” says Charlotte Neal, chief diversity officer for Toyota Motor North America, No. 48 in the DiversityInc Top 50. “Diversity and inclusion remains relevant through regular reviews of our talent pipeline to include recruiting/sourcing strategies, talent-availability studies, career development [and] succession planning through partnership with human resources.”